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Post finds climate change and demographic growth could put more people at risk for malaria by 2040

As we begin to think about mosquito season ending, in the Washington area, stumbled across this article by the Washington Post suggesting that Health data reveals seasonal changes benefit disease-carrying mosquitoes. In some regions of the world, transmission seasons could increase by up to five months by the year 2070.


The threat posed by malaria stands to soar as the planet warms because of longer transmission seasons, more frequent and severe extreme weather events, and the migration of malaria-carrying mosquitoes to new latitudes and altitudes, according to a Washington Post analysis of climate modeling and reporting from the southern African country of Mozambique.


Health data obtained and analyzed by The Post reveals how dire the situation is becoming, with Mozambique’s malaria cases on pace this year to reach their highest level since 2017, when the government began its current process for counting cases.


The results of the Post analysis reveal which countries and regions are at most risk, in particular as seasonal changes benefit disease-carrying mosquitoes. In some regions of the world, transmission seasons could increase by up to five months by the year 2070.


Which is why our season is weather dependent, which means (unless you suspend) we will spray until there's a hard frost. According to the weather, as of this posting, we will have several 80° days over the next week. That's the DC Mosquito Defense difference.





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